Monday, June 17, 2013

8 Beautiful Ways to Work Glass Into Your Kitchen Cabinets


by Shane Inman

 
Lighten up in the kitchen with see-through or glossy panes
that bounce the sun's rays or show you've got nothing to hide
Glass-front cabinets, often used in upper areas of a kitchen, can make for a pretty and practical focal point. These clear cabinets can be illuminated for ambience, display precious possessions, store functional kitchen items and ease transitions from room to room.

Can glass-front cabinets become the focal point for your kitchen? Check out the examples below to see if any of these styles will work in your home.

1. Glass-front peninsula cabinets. Some kitchens have a peninsula that divides the cooking space and another adjacent space (often the dining room). Peninsulas are accessible on three sides.

Although peninsula storage is practical, many homeowners feel that it can close the kitchen off. Adding upper glass-front cabinets to the peninsula allows for light and creates a more open feeling.
2. Frameless glass-front cabinets. Traditional glass-front cabinets have a wood frame with a glass center panel. Frameless glass-front cabinets have just one sheet of glass for the entire cabinet front. More contemporary in design, they create a sleek appearance with their decorative hinges and lack of hardware.

You may have to hunt for this style — many cabinet lines do not offer it.
 

3. Picture-window cabinets. What do you do when you have a kitchen that has more windows than wall space? Try putting your wall cabinets directly over the windows, like in this photo.

Picture-window cabinets are designed with no back panel, so sunlight can flow through.








4. Sliding glass. Once popular in the '70s, sliding cabinet doors have made a comeback in kitchens today. They glide on a recessed track (at the top and bottom) that allows two sheets of glass to travel back and forth as doors.

Sliding glass doors sometimes have hardware that is drilled directly into the glass, but many simply have a finger pull cut through the glass.

5. Decorative glass. Glass fronts, whether framed or frameless, come in many different patterns and finishes. Shown here is a popular decorative glass known as seeded glass, which has little air pockets inside to create a textured appearance. You can have your cabinet manufacturer supply the glass on purchase, or you can have the door prepped for glass. This means that the door frame will arrive without glass, and you can have another company supply the glass.

Frosted glass, etched glass, stained glass and colored glass are just a few other types of decorative glass for kitchen cabinetry.
 

 
 

6. Glass-front base cabinets. Many kitchens have glass only on upper cabinetry, but it can look just as good below, too. Glass doors on base cabinets can deliver an extra visual punch and spice up cabinetry that faces other rooms.

Keep in mind that when you're sitting at a counter, feet and knees can accidentally hit and bang the glass, so it may not be the best design for families with active children.



 

 



7. Tall glass-front cabinets. Tall cabinets are used to house extra-tall items, such as brooms, mops, cleaning supplies and certain food items. With a glass face, these cabinets can be decorative, too, displaying decorative dishes and personal items.

 


8. Painted glass-front cabinets. These cabinet doors are frameless, and the glass has been painted on the back side to maintain a wonderful glossy finish.

This particular application is referred to as a factory finish. Heavy-duty epoxy paint is uniformly applied to the reverse side of the glass in a controlled environment to prevent imperfections. The end result is a perfect finish, seen through the other side of the glass.



Looking to lighten up your kitchen, create an ambiance or display precious possessions in your cabinetry?   Let Cabinet-S-Top help you design a beautiful yet functional kitchen.  Stop by our showroom located at 1977 Medina Road, Medina, OH  44256 ~ 330.239.3630


No comments:

Post a Comment