Monday, December 22, 2014

Open vs. Closed Kitchens — Which Style Works Best for You?

by Vanessa Brunner

Get the kitchen layout that's right for you with this advice from 3 experts

For centuries the kitchen was strictly a workspace. Often tucked in the back of the house, it had room for just the bare essentials. But a peek at many new kitchens today reveals a very different approach: the open-concept kitchen at the heart of the home.

"The kitchen was really a closed-off spot for a long time," says John Petrie, president-elect of the National Kitchen & Bath Association. "Now people want the kitchen to be an active part of the family home." Although open-concept kitchens are by far the more popular choice today, some homeowners are embracing elements of the past — namely a separate, more closed-off layout. Could we be shifting back to the kitchens of yesteryear?

We asked three kitchen experts for their thoughts on the two kitchen styles, and how you can decide which one is right for you.

How the Walls Came Down

Twenty years ago the term "cocooning" arose in the home design world. Home life shifted as people spent more time at home. "Home was a safe place, a refuge and where you wanted to be," says Petrie.

The desire for a cocoon fueled the open-concept kitchen, allowing homeowners to spend more time with family and friends while cooking and cleaning. "It also showcased a shift to a more casual lifestyle," says Andrea Dixon of Fiddlehead Design Group. "People weren't afraid to expose reality — i.e., a messy kitchen." 

"When the walls came down, the kitchen became an integral part of the home," says Petrie. Kitchens soon became the center of the house — the room that everything else revolved around.

Today this layout has become the go-to kitchen style, particularly for families. The combined layout allows for optimum multitasking — parents can prepare dinner, watch the news and help with homework at the same time. "I'm a huge open-concept-kitchen fan," says Anthony Carrino of Brunelleschi Construction. "I find that the benefits far outweigh those of throwing the kitchen into another room. Ninety-nine percent of our clients ask for an open-concept kitchen."

The Case for a Closed Kitchen

The kitchen is already the most expensive room in the house to remodel, and turning a closed kitchen into an open plan can add to the cost. Tearing down walls means dealing with plumbing, electrical and structural work on a huge scale. Sometimes the added expense means compromising in other areas.

For homeowners who'd rather invest in other parts of their kitchen — appliances, materials or cabinetry — reworking the layout may not be worth it. "You have to think about what's best for you," says Petrie. When it comes to allocating your kitchen budget, which is more important, he asks, "an efficient, functional kitchen with better appliances? Or an open layout that connects to the rest of your home?"

While most of Dixon's clients ask for open-concept kitchens, some prefer a closed-off space. "There will always be some people who are uncomfortable with letting guests see their 'unmentionables,'" she says. "It's definitely a more formal layout, but it ultimately comes down to personal preference."

If you want to leave your smells and mess behind when serving meals, a closed layout could be for you.

"You can get creative with a closed kitchen, too," says Carrino. If space allows, a small booth, fold-down table or rolling bar can make a closed kitchen more of a social space.

Cons of a Closed Layout

Of course, a closed-off kitchen's isolation also can be its main downfall. This layout doesn't allow for direct access from the kitchen to the dining table, or vice versa. And it's difficult to interact with friends and family while whipping up meals, since most of the room is reserved for the work triangle.

Choosing What's Right for You

There's no set formula that can tell you which kitchen layout will work better in your home. Part of having a conversation with a designer
 is trying to figure out what's best for you. Start with a list of needs and wants, and go from there. "You've got to consider the way you live in your home and the way you use your home," says Carrino. "How do you use your kitchen? How do you foresee using your new kitchen?"

Everyone's needs are different, so don't let yourself sway with trends. "A family with kids
 that need supervision might decide to do an open-concept plan with a large multifunctional island," says Dixon. "But a couple who loves to entertain might opt for a closed-concept space so they can prep courses ahead of time and not spoil the surprise. It totally depends on your lifestyle." 

A discussion with one of Cabinet-S-Top's kitchen designers will help you know exactly how to finalize your remodeling plan.  To get started, stop by our showroom located at 1977 Medina Road, Medina, OH 44256 ~ 330.239.3630 ~ www.cabinet-s-top.com









Monday, December 15, 2014

14 Bathroom Design Ideas Expected to Be Big in 2015

by Natasha Saroca

Award-winning designers reveal the bathroom features they
believe will emerge or stay strong in the years ahead


If you’ve been thinking about giving your bathroom an overhaul but aren’t sure how, one way to start is to look to the latest design trends for inspiration. We’ve made it our mission to find out what design ideas are expected to make a splash in 2015 to help make planning your bathroom makeover project a little bit easier. To compile our list, we enlisted the help of four award-winning designers, who share here their predictions for the looks, finishes and features they think will be on everyone’s radar next year. They also reveal how they would work these ideas into their own projects.

1. Feature floor tiles. Statement-making floor tiles proved popular in 2014, and this striking look doesn’t appear to be leaving in a hurry, says interior designer Jasmine McClelland. “I have done a couple of feature floor bathrooms this year. They are stunning and provide a great design opportunity when working with challenging bathrooms that have no clear walls for a feature wall,” she says. 

“In smaller bathrooms a feature floor tile adds style without overwhelming the space, and when used in a larger bathroom, the effect is elegant,” McClelland says. “I love the space when the freestanding bath hits the feature tile … beautiful!”

2. Natural beauty. Want a bathing area that’s welcoming and serene? Then drawing design inspiration from nature is a great way to warm a typically very hard room of the house and infuse the space with a calming vibe. It’s one of the key bathroom trends of 2015, according to designers Simona Castagna and Darren Genner of Minosa.

An easy way to incorporate this trend into a bathroom design, Castagna and Genner say, is to introduce earthy materials like natural stone or wood-look tiles. The luxe bath seen here features marble floors and an onyx countertop, as well as a walnut-plank feature wall.

3. Plant life. “I know some of us have been scared off indoor plants … but it’s time to reclaim the idea of indoor plants with cascading creepers that can dress any bathroom,” McClelland says.

If you’re eager to try this trend in your bathroom but want a more sophisticated and design-savvy alternative to potted plants (hanging or not), a vertical garden may be the way to go, McClelland says.

“I love them for the interest and feel they bring to a bathroom and can’t wait to use them more in my designs for 2015,” the designer says. Another benefit of green or living walls is that they are good for the environment (as well as your health and well-being), she says.

4. The master suite retreat. Is your master bathroom cramped, not particularly inviting and tucked away out of sight? Then you may be more than happy to try this design trend when renovating your home.

Castagna and Genner say people want bigger bathrooms that are connected to the bedroom or closet, or even more open to the bedroom. People want to see their  
beautiful basins, custom vanities and freestanding baths from the bedroom, say the designers, who were the team behind the luxe, open-plan bedroom and en suite pictured here. They’re also using bigger sliding doors so people can open up or close off a space.

5. Clever water control. Say goodbye to basic shower and basin faucets, and hello to smart, user-friendly fixtures (such as thermostatic mixers; mixers that control multiple water sources, like the one used in this shower; and touchscreen-operated showers) that give users more control over the flow, mix and temperature of water, says Adelaide, Australia, interior designer Jordan Smithof Brilliant.

“Double showers would be a good place to use this, as multiple people can use the shower at the same time, with individual settings for their own shower,” Smith suggests when explaining how she’d incorporate this trend into one of her designs. “One mixer can control both multiple showers or a combination shower-bath.”

6. Freestanding bathtubs. According to McClelland, our love affair with freestanding baths isn’t over just yet, and not just because they make striking, sculptural design features, but because they help set the mood for rest and relaxation too. “The freestanding bath is more than aesthetic — it is emotive,” the designer says. “Clients connect with the possibility of a bathroom that symbolizes their own space or downtime, and a freestanding bath inspires this feeling of self-indulgence in the midst of a busy life.”

When choosing a freestanding bath, consider how the design of the tub will shape the look of your space. “The curve of a bath can bring softness to an angular bathroom, or an angular bath can offset soft colors or add to a highly structured bathroom,” saysMcClelland, who designed the Asian-inspired bathing area here.

If you want the look of a freestanding bath but the benefits of a built-in tub (such as a ledge for stowing bath essentials like soap and shampoo), consider incorporating a semi-inset stand-alone bath, says designer Owen Barnes of Bubbles Bathrooms in Melbourne, who predicts this setup will prove popular with homeowners in the year ahead. 

According to Barnes, this crafty configuration also allows freestanding tubs to be used in compact bathing areas (as you can see here), which may otherwise be too small to fit a stand-alone bath. And you can pair them with a wider range of fixtures too. 

7. Custom vanities. People now want custom vanities — made for them and their needs, rather than mass produced, say Castagna and Genner, who designed this bathing zone. The glam space features a floating vanity custom made to suit the aesthetics of the sleek, contemporary design scheme, provide plenty of storage and enhance the illusion of spaciousness.

“The good old shaving cupboard is also making a resurgence,” the designers add. 
We’re also using a lot of drawers and smart technology, such as doors that lift up and move out of way, which make good use of storage.” As you can see here, these design elements have also been incorporated into the design of this elegant bath.

8. Geometric tiles. Another major design trend for the bathroom is geometric tiles, according to McClelland. While the designer has already used geometric tiles in a few projects she’s worked on this year, she predicts the eye-catching look will become even more popular in 2015. 

According to the designer, geometric tiles are a great design solution for those who wish to add depth and visual interest to a plain, neutral space, but without the use of bright, arresting tones. And for those who aren’t color shy?

“For clients who are prepared to venture out, there are no limits to color combinations or random color placement to really showcase and lift a bathroom,” says McClelland, who designed this attention-grabbing powder room. Take note of how the bold red geometric tiles infuse this room with a hearty dose of high-impact drama, energy and tactile appeal.


9. Bigger showers. Is bigger better? According to Castagna and Genner, that’s certainly the current school of thought when it comes to the shower, and they believe the trend will become even more popular in 2015. They’re seeing more walk-in showers with oversize panes of glass or solid walls that completely enclose the space, rather than bathrooms with tiny cubicles. 

Why do they think there’s a move away from more compact showering areas to ones that are more generous in size? Larger showers are spaces for rejuvenation and wellness, they say.

If you’d prefer a shower that’s large but offers more privacy than a fully open walk-in shower or one with a partial glass screen, look to the fresh, fun bathroom here for design inspiration. Note how the lowered walls help create a private, intimate pocket where the homeowners can shower in peace, but don’t make the bath zone feel too closed in or take away from the room’s airy, spacious vibe.

10. Sustainable style. Barnes is also seeing more recycled, reclaimed and upcycled materials and products being used in the bathroom, a design idea that he predicts will become even more popular in 2015. Why? “It follows the general trend in building globally, and it looks really good when done properly,” the designer says, adding that the growing awareness surrounding sustainable living is another reason this trend will continue to rise.

Interested in incorporating this trend into your new bathroom? Consider using reclaimed wood in your design (for example, this eclectic-meets-rustic bathing zone features a reclaimed-wood feature wall); recycling materials from your existing bathroom that still hold up in terms of functionality and style; or upcycling an antique dresser or cabinet by transforming it into a vanity.

11. Bathrooms that reflect the rest of the home. A design trend that Smith predicts will be big over the coming year and beyond is a move toward bathing zones that are designed in a way that makes them look and feel like an extension of the living room, rather than a traditional bathroom.

“The bathroom seems like it’s becoming more of a feature of the house,” Smith says. Integrating freestanding baths, unconventional fixtures and vanities that resemble furniture (such as a dresser, like the leggy, custom-designed vanity seen in this elegant bathroom) are just a few ways to work this trend into your bathroom design.

Adding living room furniture and decor to your bathroom will also allow you to achieve this look and personalize your space. The welcoming bath area here shows how it’s done — the patterned floor runner, well-loved leather lounge, wall art, side table and elegant light fittings (including a chandelier and wall sconces) are key to this bathroom’s warm, calm and inviting living room–like vibe.

12. Gray tones. Gray has been a popular color choice for the bathroom in 2014, and it’s a trend that is sticking around, according to Barnes. If you’re worried a gray palette will make your bathroom feel flat and lifeless, introduce slicks of white to cut through the moody hue and create a sophisticated look. Or take design cues from this shower area and energize the design by adding a splash of bold, eye-popping color, which takes shape here in an earthy orange-bronze mosaic tile feature wall.

13. Engaging lighting. Castagna and Genner predict that the use of smart, intuitive and engaging lights in the bathroom will become a key trend for 2015. “Bathrooms and kitchens are fixed and fitted — once you screw something to a wall or tile a floor, they’ll be there for a very long time, so it’s important to be not too trendy,” the designers say. “Be smart about your decisions and layer things well — for example, with good lighting.”

What smart lighting solutions do Castagna and Genner recommend for the bathroom? “People want bathrooms that engage them, so they may want an accent light, a feature light or a sensor light that lights up their vanity or shaving cabinet once someone walks in,” they say.

For a more dynamic look, consider introducing colored LED lighting. This contemporary bathroom features a color-changing backlit vanity that instantly lifts the look and mood of this space, as well as an LED rainfall showerhead.

14. Grout as a design feature. “Grout is no longer purely a mundane, if essential, element of pulling a bathroom together,” says McClellend. “People are seeing the possibility of using grout creatively in their bathrooms to show off the pattern of how a tile is laid, highlight specific tile types and use contrasting grout as a great modern spin on the traditional subway tile.”

While McClelland loves the striking pairing of black grout and white tiles (as seen in this space), she predicts that colored grout alongside geometric shapes will become popular in 2015.

Would you like to incorporate any of these trends into your bathroom?  Let Cabinet-S-Top help you bring these trends into your design.  Stop by our showroom located at 1977 Medina Road, Medina, OH  ~ 330.239.3630 ~ www.cabinet-s-top.com 



Monday, December 8, 2014

Trend Watch: 13 Kitchen Looks Expected to Be Big in 2015

by Natasha Saroca

3 designers share their thoughts on what looks, finishesand design elements will be on trend in the year ahead


Have you been toying with the idea of revamping your kitchen and think 2015 may be the perfect time to take the plunge? Before you start searching for a pro to tackle the project, it’s important to think about what you’ll need and how you can improve your kitchen setup, as well as what you want the space to look and feel like. It’s also worth reading up on emerging kitchen trends, which may provide a spark of inspiration and, ultimately, influence the design of your new cooking zone.

Though we can’t write your dream kitchen wish list for you, we can lend a hand with a list of design elements that are on the rise. We recently caught up with three designers who shared their short lists of kitchen design and decorating ideas they believe will be the biggest trends of 2015. They also offered expert advice on how you can incorporate these ideas into your space.

1. Furniture-style design features. Interior designer Greg Natale predicts that furniture-style cabinetry and other features will be one of the top trends in 2015. This approach marks another step in the evolution of the kitchen as the hub of the home and a treasured space the whole family can enjoy, rather than just a functional area that’s used for food prep and cooking alone. “The incredible designs available celebrate the different elements of the kitchen as pieces of beautiful furniture, not just workstations, which allows people to bring their own personal, warm, welcoming touch to this space,” he says.

How can you incorporate this idea into your own kitchen? “A standout way is through an island,” says Natale, who designed the sophisticated culinary zone seen here. “Raising it on legs or including intricate paneling or a contrasting top and sides are ways of turning this into a piece to be proud of.”

2. Airy (and user-friendly), open shelving. “We are seeing a trend toward using open shelving as a practical solution for the kitchen space, rather than simply for display,” says Sydney kitchen designer Kesha Pillay of Art of Kitchens. “Open shelving personalizes the space, making it feel lived in and warm, while keeping the kitchen functional and easy to use.”

She adds, “Of course, there are always some things that you don’t want displayed, and combining open shelf cabinets and cabinets allows you to still hide things if necessary.”


3. Wallpaper that wows. Want to add interest and character to your cooking zone? Incorporating wallpaper — which will be a major trend in 2015, according to kitchen and bathroom designer Lee Hardcastle — into the design of your kitchen is the perfect solution. “Wallpaper provides an easy way to add visual impact, even in small amounts,” Hardcastle says. “Wallpaper gives you the control of complementing the architectural elements throughout the kitchen or adding a beautiful contrast to an otherwise simple color palette.”

And it won’t just be used to dress up plain walls, either; Hardcastle predicts that next year we’ll also be seeing wallpaper used in unexpected ways and spaces, such as on ceilings, to create striking features.

4. Modern traditional style. Designs that marry modern and traditional elements will be one of the most influential looks of 2015, according to Pillay, who says that homeowners are shunning ultrasleek, contemporary kitchens in favor of spaces that are “warm, homey and reflect themselves.”

“This trend is affecting everything from cabinet design to colors, materials to textures. We are really mixing it up,” she says. “Flat-panel cabinet doors are being replaced with classic door profiles, such as Shaker doors,” for example. And materials are being mixed, such as stainless steel with wood, and wood with marble.

Modern design elements, like glass backsplashes and chrome handles, are also being replaced with features that exude traditional style and charm, such as tile with black, pewter and brushed-nickel fittings, she says.

5. Ceilings that make you look up. Next year will see statement-making ceilings, says Hardcastle, who designed the striking kitchen seen here. “For a long time now, we have all forgotten to look up. More emphasis will go into ceiling design, in terms of shape, features etc.,” he says. “Whether it be through the use of lighting, bulkheads or coffer ceilings, or the addition of classic embellishments, our ceilings will become part of the room’s beauty once again.”

Not sure how to take your kitchen ceiling design to new heights? Look to the space here for inspiration. The wood design feature that frames the kitchen thoroughfare and runs from one side of the island to the bank of cabinets on the opposite wall instantly draws the eyes up, as does the row of clerestory windows that creates the illusion of a floating ceiling.

This showstopping kitchen features a bulkhead with decorative molding, exotic zebrawood detailing and colored LED lighting.
6. Luxe metallics. While silver, chrome and stainless steel are three metallics commonly used in the kitchen, next year warmer metals, like gold, copper and bronze, will have their moment to shine, according to Natale. “Metallics in all their forms were prominent at [Paris design fair Maison & Objet], from copper to bronze to gorgeous gold, and I’m a fan,” the designer says. “The texture and gleaming finish of metallics provide a stunning accent to most palette choices.”

How would Natale incorporate it into one of his projects? He’d choose gold faucets — “a little bit of decadence to dress up the everyday,” he says. 

7. Touch-me textures. “There’s a move toward using more textured and tactile materials,” Pillay says. Natural marble and granite in honed finishes, as well as engineered stones that replicate raw finishes, are a few materials we’ll be seeing a lot of next year, the designer says.

Wood will still be a trend in 2015, Pillay adds, but in finishes that represent it in its natural form, rather than high-gloss or smooth finishes.

8. Beautiful black. If you’re not too set on a colorful or an all-white kitchen, then look to the other end of the spectrum and consider choosing black as the dominant tone of your culinary zone. Natale says black will be one of the “It” colors in kitchen design next year. Why? “We spend so much time in our kitchens, and I think that more and more people want to make them a really special space. Black makes a strong, sleek statement,” he says. 

A simple way to introduce this classic, sophisticated color into your design is by opting for black cabinetry or countertops, says Natale, who designed this moody, elegant kitchen. He also suggests adding paneling to infuse the space with extra visual interest.

9. Minimal wall cabinets. Want a kitchen that feels open, airy and not too top-heavy? Then we’re sure you’ll appreciate this look, which Pillay predicts will be on the rise in 2015.“Open-plan kitchens are now being designed with fewer wall cabinets, though obviously this depends on the size of the kitchen and storage for the client,” she says.

While open-plan kitchens have long been a popular choice for homeowners, having minimal wall cabinets will further enhance a room’s sense of spaciousness. The airy, bulk-free look also allows other design elements or features to enjoy the attention they deserve, she adds, such as windows that frame a picturesque view outdoors or a striking custom-designed range hood, as seen in this contemporary cooking space.

10. Repetitive patterns. A major trend that Hardcastle is seeing is a move away from geometric patterns and toward elegant, repetitive motifs instead, which he says will take shape in the form of laser-cut plywood or steel panels, wall coverings, door inserts and tiles (as seen here).

“Patterns from bygone eras will be revitalized to create intriguing and calculated designs that appeal to the fashion-savvy,” says the designer, who predicts that art deco– and art nouveau–inspired motifs that feature hints of Turkish and other Middle Eastern influences will be quite popular in the year ahead. “Kitchen backsplashes will possibly benefit mostly from this foreseeable trend,” he says.

11. Tribal-inspired tones. Not a fan of all-white kitchens or monochromatic color schemes? Then you’re in luck, because vibrant, attention-grabbing hues are making a comeback in the kitchen.

“Color tones will likely shift to echo the diversity of nature, with inspiration drawn from the rich, bold Moroccan and Native American palette,” predicts Hardcastle. “Vibrant yet dusty shades of mustard yellows, deep scarlet, royal blues and dirty pink hues may be used in place of primary colors. We’ll still see a mix of matte and gloss finishes to inject energy in the kitchen hub.”

If you’re not too keen on investing in colored cabinetry or appliances, consider painting an accent wall, like the mustard one shown here, or introducing decorative elements in one of these hues that will be easy to replace once your love affair with the color comes to an end.

12. Vertical-joint wood paneling. Another trend that we’ll be seeing plenty of in 2015 is V-joint wood paneling, according to Natale. “It’s adynamic, eye-catching way of introducing detail to a space, enlivening an expanse of one color and using angles to bring a little movement to surfaces,” he says of the lining boards. He recommends integrating this trend into a kitchen by way of a paneled ceiling or cabinetry, both of which will add an extra layer of interest.

13. Shaker style. Classic Shaker-inspired kitchens never seem to go out of style, but Natale says this simple, timeless look will be particularly popular in 2015. “I think a lot of people like to keep things traditional and appreciate the textural beauty of wood, which was a big factor at Maison & Objet this year,” the designer says.

Keen to incorporate the trend? “I’d focus on the paneling of cupboard doors, which can work in a classic or contemporary space,” says Natale, who designed the space shown here. Such detailing is a key characteristic of Shaker style, which focuses on clean lines, craftsmanship and functionality.

Ready to take the plunge and remodel in 2015?  At Cabinet-S-Top, we're ready to help you! Stop by our showroom located at 1977 Medina Road, Medina, OH  44256 ~ 330.239.3630 ~ www.cabinet-s-top.com to get started.



















Monday, December 1, 2014

Sherwin Williams introduces the 2015 Color of the Year

2015 Color of the Year



Upbeat, optimistic Coral Reef celebrates time for renewal.

Perfectly suited to celebrate a mid-decade year that’s poised for revitalization, Coral Reef (SW 6606) is Sherwin-Williams Color of the Year 2015. The uplifting, vivacious hue with floral notes is the perfect mélange of pink, orange and red that can be used to liven up any space.
“Coral Reef embodies a cheerful approach to design that we’re seeing for the coming year. Its unexpected versatility brings life to a range of design aesthetics, whether traditional, vintage, cottage or contemporary,”    said Jackie Jordan, Sherwin-Williams director of color marketing.


Add Coral Reef to residential or commercial spaces and watch creativity blossom. Here are some design ideas for Coral Reef:

  • Let the color stand by itself on a single accent wall or front door for a pop of color.
  • Pair with complementary colors as Color Reef’s outgoing personality begs for company.
  • Paint a piece of furniture as a great accent piece.
  • Driftwood, medium wood tones and metal finishes also complement its flower-garden hue.
  • For vintage quality that’s hard to beat, Coral Reef and aged matte brass make a perfect pair.

Monday, November 24, 2014

9 Ways to Spice Up Your Kitchen Cabinetry

by Jo Leevers


If a perfectly matched set of built-in units isn’t your
cup of tea, try these ideas to add some variety

Freestanding cupboards, mix-and-match colors, contrasting textures, individual drawer pulls — kitchens can be as creative as their owners. If sleek, clean-cut units don’t get you excited, take inspiration from these nine ways to get a more varied look in the kitchen.



1. Mix cabinet styles. This kitchen’s cabinets are all the same trendy gray, but they sidestep predictable symmetry because two pieces are different styles. They work together, but their drawers have different depths and storage options. A rail for pots and pans creates more variety.

2. Feature a key piece. To keep things interesting in a kitchen with matching cabinets, add a standout storage unit. It could be a plate rack or a bright or weathered dresser. It will break up the rigidity of a single-finish kitchen and let your personality shine through.

3. Work in an island. For impact in a large kitchen, an island needs to be a “hero” piece that can carry the space. This weathered central island doesn’t conform to any norms. Along with the industrial storage on wheels, it adds just the right amount of character.

4. Try an urban loft style. A strong dose of industrial style livens up this slim kitchen. Wood, metal, gray paint and ceramic surfaces mix easily, thanks to similar tones. Then there are the contrasts: Bare bricks are mirrored by glossy metro tiles, waist-level units by a taller cabinet. Matching kitchen pieces in this space could have looked too uniform; these look freed up and innovative.


5. Go two-tone. A blend of two shades — palest green and natural bare timber — brings a breath of fresh air to this kitchen. Tongue and groove cabinets and two types of handles are extra custom twists.



6. Compare and contrast. A creative kitchen doesn’t have to be off-the-charts unusual. Simply combining two tones, two surfaces and two heights does the job. Carefully crafted finishes give the space a quality feel.

7. Cast it in monochromes. The dark-on-light color scheme here adds visual interest, and the contrast of raw, waxy timber and smooth marble creates a look that’s unique.

8. Add your own handles. This kitchen works its magic with off-the-shelf units with tactile leather handles. The handles are eye catching and pleasant to hold — significant, when you consider how often they’ll be used. Open shelving on top combines with a stainless steel countertop that wouldn’t be out of place in a chef’s kitchen.

9. Pare it back. This converted industrial warehouse is a dramatic space, so the designer wisely didn’t try to make the kitchen steal the show. Zinc-colored doors inside pale frames, metallic tones and a pared-back 1960s vibe for the furnishings help this kitchen work in its setting — proof that statements don’t always have to be shouts.

Looking for a designer to be creative in the design of your kitchen?  Then stop by Cabinet-S-Top located at 1977 Medina Road, Medina, OH  44256 ~ 330.239.3630 ~ www.cabinet-s-top.com